Why And How Even Small Amount Of Muscle Building Helps to Shoot up Metabolism

Why And How Even Small Amount Of Muscle Building Helps to Shoot up Metabolism

Why And How Even Small Amount Of Muscle Building Helps to Shoot up Metabolism

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muscle building increases metabolismYou walk, you run, and again you walk. You walk about 10 miles a day and still see no weight loss. It seems strange that some of your friends shed weight fast and you lose weight at a very low pace. Is there a connection between metabolism and body mass or is it just a myth? We are here to explain to you the interconnection between muscle building and better metabolism. Before moving further, just analyze the time you sit before a TV or a computer and the time you spend on a workout. The more you cuddle out before a PC over a burger or a cheese sandwich, the more you end up cribbing about weight gain. Instead, you should spend more time on a treadmill or sweat more at a gym to burn more calories. Lifting weights and building more muscles have several merits such as injury prevention, improved bone density, better body balancing, and a lower risk for type 2 diabetes and other diseases.

How is Metabolism and Muscle Gain Interconnected?

The connection between muscle building and better metabolism is not a myth. Though metabolism is to a certain extent determined by many elements beyond your control, like sex, genetics, and age, muscle mass can also play a major driving factor. Certain expert studies suggest that every pound of muscle burns roughly six calories per day at rest. That’s about three times as many calories as a pound of fat, which burns roughly two calories per day. But do remember that this is just an approximate number, not an accurate one. Depending on person to person, it may vary.

 

Strength Training is an Option

As metabolism is driven by hormones, sleep, diet, workout, and genetics, how does weight training help to rev up the metabolism? The answer is straight and simple. The more intense our workout is, the more calories we burn. And the more calories we burn, the more stamina we boost and this will ultimately reflect on our performance.

 

Age, Muscle Mass, and Metabolism

As we reach the mid-thirties, the body begins to slowly lose muscle mass, and within a decade or two, especially for women, the total muscle mass gets lost by 15%, ultimately resulting in the decline of strength and metabolism. Fortunately, with strength training, we can overcome this concern and can rev up the muscle mass and metabolism.

 

So What’s The Bottom Line Here?

Let’s keep it simple. The takeaway is that even minimal muscle building can have a positive impact on your metabolism. There is no denial that calorie-burning may vary widely from person to person, depending upon several factors, such as your genetics, eating habits, health conditions, style of work out, sleep, and stress. But make strength training sessions a part of your fitness routine as it worth a lot and keeps you healthier. An increase in muscle mass means intense calorie burning and better metabolism. Stay healthy to live lengthily.


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